Tributes to the Fallen

Engineers have always been at the forefront of battle and the burden of death we share is proportionally as high as any other arm.

In these pages, we have gathered just a small sample of the sacrifice by focusing on key battles and operations in our history.

  • Tributes to the Fallen Sappers of the Dieppe Raid:  19 August 2017 marks the 75th Anniversary of Operation JUBILEE, the Dieppe Raid.   Canadian Sappers suffered 85% casualties that day – the worst of any unit. Of the 71 assault sappers who landed, only ten returned to England and only eight of 98 sappers from the demolition teams returned. In all, 27 died on the beaches, in the boats, later in hospital or in captivity. As part of our activities to recognise the 75th Anniversary of the Dieppe Raid, the CMEA has written a tribute to recognize each Canadian Sapper who died on the Raid or while Prisoner of War. Take some time to scroll through the list and remember these brave young men of Canada.
  • Juno Beach Tributes: D-Day Fallen SappersAs part of its activities to celebrate the 70th Anniversary of D-Day in 2014, the Juno Beach Center released a “Tributes” feature to recognize each Canadian Soldier who died on 6 June 1944 during the Normandy Invasion. The initial details in the Tributes were sketchy at best, and mostly incomplete. With the assistance of students from Smiths Falls ON, the 6th Field Engineer Squadron Museum Association in North Vancouver BC and members of the 5th Field Company Veterans Association in Ottawa, the CMEA developed a profile on each of the 18 sappers killed on D-Day, most of whom landed ahead of the assaulting infantry. Sapper casualties, dead, wounded and missing, were proportionately among the highest of all branches. Take a moment to view the tributes to our D-Day sappers who sacrificed their lives. Scroll through the complete set to appreciate the many "Average Canadians" who responded to the call during the Second World War and how each one contributed to the successful D-Day invasion.